First Thing: Trump pleads not guilty and claims ‘political persecution’ | US news


Good morning.

Donald Trump yesterday became the first former U.S. president to face federal criminal charges after pleading not guilty to all charges related to his alleged mishandling of classified documents.

Trump was greeted by chaotic scenes in a Miami federal courthouse, where hundreds of protesters gathered to celebrate or denounce him. He was accompanied by his son Eric Trump.

  • Hours after his arraignment, Donald Trump in New Jersey, He told a crowd of supporters at one of his golf resorts that his prosecution was a “corrupt” and “political pursuit” aimed at destroying him.

  • Here is a rundown of all the major players mentioned in Trump’s 44-page federal indictment. Richard Luscombe sketches the courtroom scene.

  • Adding to Trump’s legal woes yesterday, New York author E Jean Carroll won a $5 million jury verdict against the former president last month and can now bring a $10 million related defamation case against him, a federal judge has ruled.

U.S. House calls on Russia to release Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich

American journalist Evan Gershkovich stands in the defendant's cage as a hearing considers his appeal against his arrest at the Moscow City Court.
American journalist Evan Gershkovich stands in the defendant’s cage as a hearing considers his appeal against his arrest at the Moscow City Court. Photo: Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images

Yesterday, the US House of Representatives unanimously passed a resolution calling for the release of Wall Street Journal reporter Gershkovich.

Gershkovich, an American citizen, has been held in Russian custody for three months. He was arrested in March on espionage charges after FSB security accused him of gathering military secrets in the Ural city of Yekaterinburg. Gershkovic and his employer deny the allegations.

Ukraine war sees biggest rise in displacement in decades

A brother and sister from Lviv wait at the Medyka pedestrian crossing in eastern Poland on February 26, 2022.
A brother and sister from Lviv wait at the Medyka pedestrian crossing in eastern Poland on February 26, 2022. Photo: Wojtek Radwański/AFP/Getty Images

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has led to the largest annual increase in the number of people forcibly displaced in decades due to persecution, conflict, violence and human rights violations, according to the UN refugee agency.

The number of displaced persons has grown by 21% to an estimated 108.4 million by 2022. That number could rise to 110 million by May 2023.

In other news…

Smoke billows south of Khartoum on June 12, 2023, after a 24-hour ceasefire in Sudan ended and deadly shelling and gunfire resumed.
Smoke billows south of Khartoum on June 12, 2023, after a 24-hour ceasefire in Sudan ended and deadly shelling and gunfire resumed. Photo: AFP/Getty Images
  • As fighting continues between Sudan’s two rival military factions, Rape survivors in Khartoum are struggling to get emergency contraception and abortion pills.

  • a los angeles city MP charged with 10 counts, including embezzlement and perjury, Upended the scandal-plagued council on Tuesday in the latest criminal case.

  • Death toll linked to Kenyan cult priest accused of ordering his followers to starve to death The number of people who have met Jesus has risen to 300.

  • Pride decorations removed from Starbucks stores Because of a new policy, American workers say.

  • U.S. District Judge Grants FTC’s Request to Temporarily Block Microsoft’s $69 Billion Takeover Video game maker Activision Blizzard.

Today’s data: the number of marriages in China fell to The lowest on record since 1986.

On May 20, 2023, in Hefei City, Anhui Province, newlyweds wearing traditional Chinese costumes participated in a group wedding ceremony.
On May 20, 2023, in Hefei City, Anhui Province, newlyweds wearing traditional Chinese costumes participated in a group wedding ceremony. Photo: VCG/Getty Images

The number of couples marrying in 2022 will be about 800,000 fewer than the already record low in 2021, according to figures released by China’s Ministry of Civil Affairs. The number of marriages in China last year was 6.83 million, falling to the lowest level since records began in 1986.

DON’T MISS THIS: Cormac McCarthy dies at 89

Cormac McCarthy
Famed author Cormac McCarthy has died at the age of 89. Photo: Prof Proz/Kobal/Shutterstock

Cormac McCarthy, author of “Blood Meridian,” “The Old Road” and “No Country for Old Men,” has died at his home of natural causes at the age of 89.

Widely considered one of America’s greatest novelists, McCarthy’s bleak, apocalyptic visions of the South revealed to the world the violent heart of America. His succinct style of combining poetic descriptions with light plots has also made the film adaptations of his works popular.

…or this: Bhopal Long Dark Shadows

Children with congenital disabilities believed to be caused by a gas leak that their parents suffered during the 1984 Bhopal disaster join their relatives and supporters at a candlelight vigil in November 2019.
Children with congenital disabilities believed to be caused by a gas leak that their parents suffered during the 1984 Bhopal disaster join their relatives and supporters at a candlelight vigil in November 2019. Photo: Sanjeev Gupta/EPA

Forty years ago, 27 tons of methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas leaked from a storage tank at the Union Carbide chemical plant in Bhopal, spreading across the sleepy city of Madhya Pradesh, India. People died from uncontrollable vomiting, convulsions. Some suffocated and drowned in their own bodily fluids, while others died in a stampede in narrow alleyways as residents panicked and fled a spreading cloud of white gas.

Years later, the deaths continued, with survivors succumbing to cancer.Test groundwater and well water near the plant Shows mercury levels up to 6m times More than the EPA considers safe. “Lucky are those who died that night,” said survivor Rashida Bi, who has seen five members of her family die from various types of cancer over the past three decades.

Climate check: A ‘death sentence’ for the world’s poor

Swedish environmental activist Greta Thunberg speaks during a news conference at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Bonn, Germany, June 13, 2023.
Swedish environmental activist Greta Thunberg speaks during a news conference at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Bonn, Germany, June 13, 2023. Photograph: Benjamin Westhoff/EPA

Rich countries are signing a “death sentence” for millions of the world’s poor if fossil fuels are not phased out, Greta Thunberg warned yesterday.

“The coming months and years — now — will be critical to what the future looks like. The future of humanity will be determined by the decisions we make now,” she told a news conference at the United Nations talks in Bonn, where governments are gathering to Meet to discuss the climate crisis.

One Last Thing: A Whale of an Era

An adult orca and a juvenile orca.
An adult orca and a juvenile orca. Photo: Facebook

About 30 orcas played “like children in the park” in California’s Monterey Bay this weekend, doing belly flops, beating waves with their tail fins and spraying water from their blowholes. Marine biologists say they’ve never seen the animals engage in such playful behavior for so long.

Sign up

Sign up for the US Morning Briefing

First Thing is delivered to thousands of inboxes every weekday. If you haven’t registered yet, please subscribe now.

keep in touch

If you have any questions or comments about any of our newsletters, please email newsletters@theguardian.com



This news collected fromSource link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

leveluplimo